Erectile Dysfunction Profile

 

£179.00

 

Book Now

 

What can I expect from the Erectile Dysfunction Profile?

This profile checks for a range of male hormones and other health indicators which can contribute to erectile dysfunction.


 

This test checks 15 different biomarkers. Click on the sections below to discover more detailed information

 

 

The liver is responsible for many of the body's essential functions such as regulating blood sugar levels, fighting infections and detoxifying your blood. Good liver function is vital to your overall health and wellbeing. 

Albumin

Albumin is a protein specifically produced in the liver. Its function consists of keeping fluids in the bloodstream as well as transporting substances like hormones and vitamins throughout the body. Albumin tests can be used to help diagnose and monitor diseases of the liver and kidney. 

 

 

There are many types of hormones that support different bodily functions and processes including growth, metabolism, appetite and fertility. Hormone imbalances or deficiencies may be to blame for a wide range of symptoms and conditions. 

Free Testosterone Calculation

Free Testosterone Calculation is a measurement of the amount of free testosterone in the body. It is a steroid hormone produced by the male testes and the adrenal glands in both men and women. It regulates the male sex drive and maintains muscle mass. Free testosterone calculation is used in the diagnosis of various conditions such as erectile dysfunction and infertility in men.

Prolactin

Prolactin is a hormone produced by the pituitary glands in the brain. The main role of prolactin is to promote lactation (breast milk production) in women during pregnancy and after childbirth. A prolactin test is used to diagnose infertility in both men and women as well as menstrual problems and erectile dysfunction.

Sex Hormone Binding Globulin

Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) is a protein produced by the liver. Its main function is to bind and transport the hormones oestradiol, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone in the blood. The SHBG test is used to diagnose testosterone deficiency in men and is used to investigate the production of testosterone in women.

Testosterone

Testosterone is an important sex hormone for both men and women. In men, it is made in the testicles. In women, it is made in small amounts in the ovaries.

It is important for normal male sexual development. During puberty (in the teen years), testosterone helps boys develop male features like body and facial hair, a deeper voice, and muscle strength. Too much testosterone in men can cause shrinking of the testicles, impotence, an increased risk of heart attack and prostate enlargement with difficulty urinating. Too little can cause fatigue, irritability, depression, erectile dysfunction and reduced muscle mass. 

Combined with oestrogen, testosterone helps with the growth, maintenance, and repair of a woman's reproductive tissues and bone mass. Too much can cause acne, excess hair on the face and body, irregular periods and mood changes. Too little can cause low libido and weight gain. 

 

 

Checking your levels of HbA1c is a way of confirming if you have (or are at risk of developing) diabetes. Unmanaged or undiagnosed diabetes is one of the leading causes of mortality. For anyone who already knows they have diabetes, regular HbA1c checks are essential to monitor progress. 

Haemoglobin A1c

Haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test is used to measure the average level of blood sugar over the past two to three months and is commonly used to diagnose and monitor diabetes. The sugar is called glucose which builds up in the blood and binds to the haemoglobin in the red blood cells. 

 

 

High cholesterol levels can cause your arteries to become blocked - leading to coronary heart disease, heart attack or stroke. Finding out about high levels of cholesterol can help you to make the positive lifestyle and dietary changes needed to improve your chances of a long and healthy life. 

HDL percentage

This is the percentage of Total Cholesterol that consists of ‘good’ (HDL) cholesterol. 

High Density Lipoprotein

High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) is a form of cholesterol which is classified as the ‘good’ cholesterol. Its main function is to help remove cholesterol from the heart’s arteries. HDL tests are used to estimate the risk of developing circulatory diseases such as heart attacks and strokes. 

Low Density Lipoprotein

Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) is classified as the ‘bad’ cholesterol, this causes cholesterol build-up and blockage in the arteries. LDL tests are used to estimate the risk of developing circulatory diseases such as heart attacks and strokes. 

Non-HDL-Cholesterol

Non-HDL Cholesterol is the number of total cholesterols without the high-density lipoprotein (HDL), the ‘good’ cholesterol. Non-HDL cholesterol tests are used to investigate the lipid profile during the estimation of the risk of developing circulatory diseases such as heart attacks and strokes. 

Total Cholesterol

Total Cholesterol is a measurement of the total amount of cholesterol in the blood, this includes low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterols. It is used to produce hormones for development, growth and reproduction. Total cholesterol tests are used to estimate the risk of developing circulatory diseases such as heart attacks and strokes. 

Total Cholesterol: HDL Ratio

Total Cholesterol: HDL Ratio is a calculation which indicates the ratio of ‘good’ cholesterol in terms of the total cholesterol in the body. HDL helps to remove cholesterol from the heart’s arteries. Total cholesterol: HDL ratio tests are used to estimate the risk of developing circulatory diseases such as heart attacks and strokes. 

Triglyceride

Triglyceride is a type of fat stored in the body’s tissues and can derive from foods such as butter and oil. Triglyceride tests are used to investigate the lipid profile during the estimation of the risk of developing circulatory diseases such as heart attacks and strokes. 

 

 

There are many types of hormones that support different bodily functions and processes including growth, metabolism, appetite and fertility. Hormone imbalances or deficiencies may be to blame for a wide range of symptoms and conditions.

Prostate Specific Antigen

Prostate Specific Antigen

 

 

Thyroid disorders are common but often remain undiagnosed. If your thyroid isn't functioning properly, it can cause tiredness, mood problems and weight issues. 

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) are made by the pituitary gland in the brain to stimulate the thyroid gland (located by the throat). The hormones that are produced are used to regulate weight, body temperature and muscle strength. Levels of TSH are measured as it is an indicator of thyroid disease and is commonly tested with Free T4 and Free T3. It will give you a very good indication of whether your thyroid is functioning normally or not which can lead to tiredness, mood problems and weight issues.

 

 


 

How does it work?

Image 1 Image 2 Image 3

 

There is no better way to check for underlying health problems or monitor existing conditions, than with a blood test. In collaboration with our dedicated, state-of-the-art laboratory partner in London we offer the latest in pathology testing solutions across many disciplines including biochemistry, immunology, haematology, and molecular biology. 

Whether you are concerned about your health, managing an existing condition or simply curious, our partner laboratory provides a fast, affordable, and easy way to start taking charge of your own health. 

You will receive your results on the day after your sample is received by the laboratory, this is usually within 2-3 days of having your blood taken in-store. 

The laboratory runs a 24/7 operation and tests all samples as quickly as possible after receiving them which enables the team of in-house GPs to review and communicate your results in the fastest possible timeframe. 

*It is important to note that blood tests alone are not a substitute for seeing a doctor, particularly if you have any symptoms. You should not make a diagnosis or start any treatment without a consultation with a doctor or suitably trained healthcare professional.